Tag Archives: business

C4CC is amazing – what next?

C4CC-LOGO
The Centre for Creative Collaboration
will close on 17 December 2014

C4CC will close at noon on 17th December 2014.  For 5 years, we have supported collaborations between Universities, businesses, staff and students and creative freelancers.  In the past two years we have also worked with Small and Medium Enterprises across London as part of the London Creative and Digital Fusion project – supporting more than 200 businesses directly ourselves.  We’ve also helped to form and support 37 start-ups creating over 100 jobs.

We’ve spoken to our resident projects and partners about the closure over the past month or so – and this post will, I hope, let a wider group of friends hear the news directly from us.  To cut a very long story short – our funding has finished, the University of London has decided not to support us further and the lease on our building expires early next year.

I talked to Lloyd Davis recently and we recalled the excitement of getting the keys early in February 2010 – and how big and empty the space seemed.  The project was scary and exciting at the same time.  It’s worth remembering that, when we did the research for the project (in 2008/9) there were very few spaces in London that we would now recognise as co-working or collaboration spaces.  So it was a bit of a leap in the dark – and a testament to the vision of our early supporters, especially Sir Graeme Davies who was
Vice-Chancellor of the University of London at that time.

We will hold an event on 12 December at C4CC to share our experiences, tell stories and celebrate what we’ve all been part of – if you would like an invitation, please let me know.

My plan is to ‘to do my own thing’ again as an independent consultant and adviser; I’m looking at a number of opportunities for 2015.  I’ve learnt a lot of new (and I hope useful!) things in the past 5 years – and I will be happy to help other people and projects to benefit from my experience.  So if you’d like to talk about opportunities to work together, please get in touch.

I am on social media as brian_condon or add a comment to this blog.

Women in Leadership

Ruby McGregor-Smith, CEO of Mitie, speaking on Women in Leadership: Breaking Down Barriers.

David Docherty says Ruby is one of the few women running a FTSE 250 company.

Ruby at NCUBRuby starts by saying “It’s a rare thing to be both female and Asian and be at the top of a FTSE business”

Women have a massive role to play. We need gender equality at the top of businesses and we need to celebrate diversity. I was successful because I joined a very young organisation in a very young industry. We had fewer hierarchies and could think about talent differently. The Chair and CEO said ‘we’ll teach you’ as they knew I hadn’t done it before. It needs mentoring and support at different levels in women’s careers.

When I became a mother – it was almost impossible to juggle everything. I took 2 years out. The non-execs of MITIE didn’t really understand that, but it worked. She also chairs the Women’s Business Council – and that’s about understanding the barriers at each stage of a career.

It starts early in schools and colleges and Universities – and it’s about setting aspirations. Needs more collaboration on careers – and this is pretty weak still. We’re still grappling with understanding how and where to recruit the right graduates for example.

Loads of barriers – how do we start a business – where do we get the mentoring and support we need.

While things have changed over the past 25 years – there is still much to do on diversity – beyond gender. Need to make sure young people demand and expect equality in the workplace.  More work to do.

We shouldn’t underestimate how far we’ve come – and culture is slow and difficult to change. We do need to support people to rise through the ranks.

In the world of facilities management – it’s very male dominated. Don’t focus on your differences – focus on your talent. Difficult to achieve but we can make progress on this – at every single level. Young people need the biggest possible aspirations – and it’s time to make sure this happens and that people see the opportunities and are able to grasp them.

Q- what role doe employees have to play in helping with career guidance?

Ruby says that school is very different from the workplace – we need to help young people to understand what work is like – and there’s a role for existing employees to help with this. It’s very important that graduates and others are supported in the early stages of their careers.

Q – what is in the gift of the government?

Flexible working is very important – and affordable childcare for families (not just for women). There are specific things government can do. They’ll say there’s no money – but they have to spend money on something.

How can universities help?

Better workplacements, a better understanding of the role of outsourcing – not always the most popular of industries.

Q – which countries have better working practices than the UK?

Ruby says the US is better in certain areas – but she doesn’t like quotas. We have a multi-level problem. We seem to have issues at each level in our organisations.

Q – how about the difference between the best person vs the best team issue?

She says if you pick the best person they should find the best team [errrm].

Q. – role of apprenticeships

Ruby says they are as important as graduates and often better. We have about 500 apprentices and this is more than the number of graduates we recruit. They are very important to us.

Q – re aspirations and people recruiting “people like us”. How can we change this?

Select talented people and give them responsibility early – be less hierarchical – fast track people to big roles early.

Q – re lifelong learning – how to implement in business?

Ruby responds that we need to make developing people integral to the role of the business – send them to a business school – make sure you keep them up to date – very important.

Q – who helped you develop and who mentored you?

Partner in accounting firm, CEO of SERCO – provided her with encouragement and support. I wish I’d had more confidence and self belief. We also need to develop cultures where ‘getting things wrong is an important part of every day”

Q – Ageism is an issue for women – often they are considered ‘past it’

A – Not about age – it’s about ability to deal with change and deal with rapidly moving markets. We need to help women get back into work – it’s a big untapped market and they need to be brought back into the workplace.

Q – How do we deal with demands on women to be the main Carer especially as parents get older. How do we change that?

No easy answer. It’ll take a long time – but increased flexibility in working will help – fitting more things around work. Changing society is a tough call.

Q – what could businesses do to help fathers play a bigger part especially when their children are younger and need someone to go to them

A – Boards need to be family friendly – once that happens things will improve.

Q – re leaving for extended periods to have children vs the idea of ‘backing off’

A  Once you’re out of the workplace – the phone stops ringing and no one is interested. This is very difficult.  It is very hard coming back in  – and you just have to make it work.

Q- do you need to behave like a man to make it in business?

A – It’s a shame if women feel like that – it’s important that people are prepared to be themselves. I always tried hard to be me and I think that’s the way we can make progress.

NextGen Roadshow Milton Keynes

NextGen Milton Keynes

Transformational Infrastructure. A liveblog – with text from David Brunnen and Brian Condon together with conversations and comments from the #nextgen12 Twitter hashtag.

Storified by Brian_Condon · Wed, Jun 06 2012 10:39:37

Participants gather for NextGen Roadshow Milton Keynes to discuss superfast broadband #nextgen12 #digitalbritain twitpic.com/9qvkttBrian_Condon
At MKStadium for #nextgen12 seeing lots of old friends #digitalbritain
Councillor David Hopkins talks about the strategic location of Milton Keynes and the importance of getting very high speed broadband.
Cllr Hopkins #NextGen12 – Milton Keynes is the fastest growing location in the country
David Hopkins talks about the importance of the Internet of Things to the future of Milton Keynes’ economy #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qvoujBrian_Condon
David Hopkins is giving an overview of how important digital networks are to the businesses of the region – citing great examples like the Red Bull F1 racing team and the nearby Silverstone race track.

He is quoting Cisco research on the expected growth of broadband demand and the need for high capacity links.

He says that in spite of national doom and gloom on the economic front he says that in Milton Keynes they are experiencing rapid growth and much of that is critically based on the digital infrastructure.

The 2020 vision for Milton Keynes is a fundamental part of their thinking.
David Hopkins highlights 20 key trends that MK is very focused on. #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qvqivBrian_Condon

The Benefits of Fit-For-Purpose Broadband

Crister Mattsson from Sweden is on stage and giving results from his latest research. His analysis shows how growth of GDP is intrinsically linked to high quality broadband infrastructure. The Swedish government’s plan – an information society for all – was based around principles that can easily be translated to the UK environment.
Christer Mattsson uses developments in Sweden to highlight the issues facing all of us in Europe. He particularly focuses on the need to encourage incumbents to invest. There are 100 new service providers in Sweden.
In Sweden 200 municipalities are building their own networks 87% public ownership #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qvsz9Brian_Condon
Christer says that these new networks enable new services that have an effect on society.
87% of Swedish networks are owned by the public sector – Mattson #NextGen12
With FTTH 20% work from home; with copper it’s only 5% says Christer Mattsson at #nextgen12 #digitalbritain
But the benefits are not just economic – his studies for the Swedish government have also shown the positive impacts on society at larges and the efficiency of public sector services. Open Access – the view from Sweden is that unbundling is not enough – all levels of provision need to be separated with utility network access being considered and regulated in different ways to competitive services.

Crister highlights a distinction between the former incumber telco’s and new communications providers – the latter often locally based. 200 out of 297 municipalities are building their own networks and majority owned by the public sector – and making money – a process which keeps local taxes down! He also cites the plentiful availability of dark fibre – enabling businesses to create their own private networks. He has just commented on the ‘uncultured values’ that justify the investment and help develop new models for investment for high-speed access. The new services that did not exist before are an indication of the boost to innovation and inward investment to rural and less-favoured areas. He describes a virtuous circle of investment engendering new growth and improvements in the quality of life. he cites savings made by city of Stockholm – savings that have lowered taxes and, at the same time, improved the quality of life and public services delivery.

Crister Mattson #NextGen12 explaining the Swedish Market Landscape for Next Generation build
Fibre users are happier than copper users – it’s true! – Mattson #NextGen12
#nextgen12 Crister Mattsson: "take the initiative with infrastructure" certainly will! #digitalbritain

Delivering Next Generation Broadband to Accelerate Growth

Dr Ann Limb OBE DL now speaking – from Sweden to SEMLEP #NextGen12
She confesses to being technologically inexpert but has a very clear view of the outcomes and benefits of better broadband.  Ann has in fact a great track record in previous government initiatives over the past decade – LearnDirect and YouGov. 

The failure, she says, was that we neglected investment in the infrastructure and we now need to play ‘catch-up’ to accelerate growth.

. @AnnLimb agrees with Christer Mattsson that the UK isPlaying Catch Up in digital infrastructure #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qvxnjBrian_Condon
The role of the digital natives and the importance to the education of our children is at the heart of the future Internet says Dr Ann Limb – she agrees with Christer Mattsson that more pressure should have been put on incumbents to invest in infrastructure.
Superfast broadband – everyone wants it – Ann Limb #NextGen12
The region has particularly strong digital needs with a diversity of environments of city and rural areas.  Key objective is accelerating growth through digital investment and the SEMLEP has a champion appointed to make sure that faster and higher quality infrastructure will be increased – with a focus on businesses, rural areas and disadvantaged/excluded groups within society.
#NextGen12 RT @NeelieKroesEU: RT @kilfrew: RT @twECTA: "investing in telecoms is not too risky, it has to be done" #ftth #broadband
#NextGen12 Ann Limb speaking about her role for UKonline and Directgov
Debates began to break out on Twitter – both about Christer’s presentation and Ann’s remarks
@EventsNextGen #NextGen12 surely its the package, price and service experience that decides?
@Watchingtheflow currently its cheap packages and rubbish service for many. We need fibre. moral and optic. #NextGen12
@Watchingtheflow @brian_condon It was a comparison, not a trend he was referring to. #nextgen12 #digitalbritain
@cotswoldsbb @brian_condon #nextgen12 #digitalbritain and it s just not believable,
@Watchingtheflow haven’t seen any plans for that. Only cabinets. that isn’t real fibre broadband, comes through an old phone line #NextGen12
Ann Limb doesn’t understand why superfast broadband isn’t offered as a utility in new build particularly social housing #NextGen12 @AnnLimb
@EventsNextGen @AnnLimb Fibre ducting should be compulsary on any new builds at the very least. Even if not a fibre area yet. #NextGen12
@Yorkie71 @watchingtheflow @eventsnextgen Very good presentation by @annlimb at #NextGen12

Fibre To The Home from Start to Finish

Adam Ashenden of Prysmian

Very few delegates acknowledged any awareness of Prysmian – so Adam began his presentation by explaining that with the merger of Draka and Prysmian they are well established as a cable manufacturer in the Uk and have vast experience across continental Europe in Fibre-to-the home networks.
Adam Ashenden of Prysmian uses a real project #nextgen12 to highlight the issues in delivering #ftth twitpic.com/9qw0zjBrian_Condon
Adam’s first case study looked at a major project in Edinburgh – a complex project covering three areas and a potential extension to Edinburgh airport. Part of the solution involved pre-configutred Point of Presence – ready made units that could be used to deliver the hubs for the networks without extensive modifications of unsuitable buildings.

Adam then focused on the cables and ducts and the civil engineering challenges. In some areas duct networks existed and could be re-used but in other areas they worked with other utilities – including the sewer networks.

The city fibre ring needed to allow for extension to the airport but it also needed to link the three distinct areas. Part of the Prysmian solution benefited from their experience in Paris where they developed smaller cables with great capacity. They also developed a micro-ducting system to allow rapid deployment with air-blown systems – blown fibres are likely to last at least 25 years – vastly better than cables that are strained by pulling them in.

It is the experience and development capability of Prysmian and their ability to work with other agencies that contributes to these successful FTTH deployments.

His final point was that customer engagement was massively beneficial – many customers are happy to assist with the cable dig for the last few metres – reducing cost and gaining customer commitment.

Adam argues that it’s important for those involved in local broadband plans; whether from local authorities or parish councils to have a good understanding of the technical issues in helping to decide the various routes and technologies needed to deliver these projects. Different local situations will demand different solutions.
Adam says that it’s very important to make sure that you spend time working together to understand the needs of the area and customer groups – you can’t separate an understanding of locality and the infrastructure issues.

Further, faster & affordable – the latest from BT

Brendan Dick Managing Director BT Scotland & Managing Director BT Regions

Brendan Dick of BT says that in FTTC enabled areas, you’ll be able to order FTTP – no date mentioned #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qw8vpBrian_Condon
Brendan starts with mentioning Rio+20(the forthcoming UN Summit) and the need to see ICT investment as a major contribution to sustainability (NextGen’s Marit Hendriks will be attending Rio+20 and expects to interview some of the UN Broadband Commission leaders)

Brendan first point – ‘Faster’ – was that from next year that businesses will be able to order fibre connectivity on demand. He also mentioned to predominance of businesses operated from home.
This would, he said, transform the way we live and work and will be a fundamentally key component of economic growth.

#NextGen12 Brendan Dick, BT: broadband is an enabler for how we live, how we work & how we make our economy thrive. <– Nicely put!
RT @paulinerigby: #NextGen12 not naming names, but the word "solutions" should be banished forever unless you really do mean dissolved in liquid
Brendan mentions that soon, businesses and others in areas that have FTTC will be able to order Fibre to the Premises as a sort of ‘on demand’ service.
His second point – Affordability – is not an issue – largely on account of the service providers that work with BT.

For Milton Keynes Brendan highlighted some local initiatives – ‘75% (more than 85,000 premises) have access to super fast broadband’. This is primarily ‘fibre to the cabinet’.

BT has apparently been surprised that take-up has been higher than the 35% they expected.

BT’s plans for #mk at #nextgen12 in Milton Keynes twitpic.com/9qwa2mBrian_Condon
Brendan highlighted the benefits to the UK economy – 0.3 to 0.5% contribution to GDP growth.

Brendan says that BT is engaged in future-proofing the UK’s telecoms network. They are now trialling faster speeds over combined fibre/copper networks. BY may believe in the utopia (of FTTH) but are rooted in the practical challenges of today – using mixes of technology to deliver basic broadband to 100% of the country.

RT @johnpopham: MT @brian_condon: BT say they are trialling, in the lab, 1 Gbps over Cu. #NextGen12 << It would be nice if we all lived in labs wouldn’t it?Edgar Aker
"Future Proofing" issues for #digitalbritain according to BT #nextgen12 twitpic.com/9qwbf3Brian_Condon
If the exchange is upgraded, the ducting in place and 1500 homeowners want it, why do BT not upgrade??? #nextgen12
@paulinerigby Brendan said he couldn’t help our area. ‘BT is not a charity’ http://t.co/m78xpTaK #NextGen12
Brendan Dick uses fibre example of the Well at Willen #NextGen12 from 2mbps to 40mbps – great improvement, businesses grow and thrive
75% of premises in Milton Keynes have access to fibre broadband thanks to BT’s investment – Brendan Dick #NextGen12
Lancashire, Rutland, Cornwall, Isles of Scilly, Northern Ireland all have significant fibre roll out – Brendan Dick #NextGen12

QUESTIONS FROM FLOOR

BT seems not to be providing FTTC to Milton Keynes to business parks – does this mean that BT expects businesses to buy more-expensive provisions.

Brendan responded by highlighting the priorities (from the BDUK programme) to fill the most needy gaps.

A question about rural areas produced response that it was a matter of market priorities – looking for the most likely take-up areas first – but all of this must fit with the BDUK programme.

BT. We need to stimulate market and digital inclusion important but also sustainability – leave a positive lasting impact #NextGen12
RT @RobDChambers: Feisty lot at #nextgen12 – laying into BT <- we think BT is v important but not the whole answer :)

The role of Broadband Delivery UK (“BDUK”)

Robert Ling

Now #NextGen12 @ling_robert BDUK – we are committed to delivering the best superfast broadband network in Europe by 2015
Robert Lin of #BDUK introducing BDUK and its goals #NextGen12 twitpic.com/9qwodmBrian_Condon
@ling_robert Ling picture http://t.co/0jZswzU1 now speaking #NextGen12 Milton Keynes
Robert’s on the government’s objectives and BDUK processes.

He expressed some satisfaction that their process was on schedule and the responses from Local Authorities had been very encouraging. The process had been greatly benefited from clarification of the State Aid issues and an umbrella agreement agreed with the European Commission.

The 2nd round for bids opened on the 10th May and will close on 6th July. The first round (January) resulted in 16 applications out of 39 being approved.

BDUK pot: £530M on superfast broadband, £150 for superconnected cities & £150M to improve mobile infrastructure, says Rob Ling #NextGen12
Cities have until 2 August to submit full bids at which point actual allocations will be made @ling_robert #NextGen12
The Super-Connected Cities initiated in the budget resulted in indicative funding allocations being made – and a meeting on 14th June with all applicant will clarify the next steps.

A further programme for Mobile investment – details on the DCMS website.

Major issue – Demand Stimulation – DCMS working with GO ON UK ( a ‘reincarnation of RACE Online 2012) – is a key part of the strategy. Robert is keen to see a strong business focus and a collaborative culture that brings together many organisations such as FSB.

Second wave of smaller superconnected cities is now on the way #bduk #nextgen12
Robert Ling says they got 39 responses to the Rural Broadband Fund which given timescales was "phenomenal" #NextGen12 twitpic.com/9qwp6fBrian_Condon
Rob Ling #NextGen12 Rural Community Broadband Fund (for areas not addressed by local authority schemes) round 2 opens 10 May, closes 6 July
@ling_robert speaking about @Go_ON_UK campaign who picked up baton from Race Online 12 to get final 8.12m online #NextGen12 in Milton Keynes

Fibre To The Home Council Europe

Nadia Babaali

Nadia starts by mentioning their partnership with NextGen and highlights the forthcoming NextGen 12 conference (Oct 8 & 9) in London.

FTTH Council was formalised in 2004 and is now a major industry organisation – with a vision for a sustainable future.

The FTTH Council Europe’s 10th anniversary conference (Feb 2013) will be held in London – the first time that it has been in England.

In line with the other FTTH Councils around the world the council’s league tables only count those homes and buildings that are actually connected by fibre.

Europe and CIS countries in total have more FTTH connections than the USA.

Take-up rates appear to be higher in CIS countries.

In the global rankings of countries with more than 200,000 households and more than 1% connected by FTTH. The Aisian countries (e.g. South Korea) are in the lead and Lithuania is the highest European entry.

In Europe there are 20 countries with more than 1% penetration and this table is lead by Nordic and Eastern European countries. Growth rates in Eastern Europe are now leading the market.

Babaali #NextGen12 Lithuania ranks NO1 with highest penetration of FTTH hear Lithuanian regulator at Scotland NG 7 June http://t.co/npMT6ZYw
Nadia Babaali of Fibre to the Home council points out worrying trends for EU in #ftth – other parts of world faster growing #nextgen12
France and Italy are on the table but Germany, Spain and UK have not yet achieved 1% penetration.

The Council have analysed projects by ‘type of player’ – Municipalities, Alternative Operators and European Incumbents. The first two categories have been important in driving Incumbents towards a more innovative approach.

In the ‘Race to Fibre Maturity’ (when 20% penetration is expected) the UK is not expected to achieve this until some time after 2022 – and long other most others. This prediction suggests that the UK may not achieve the EU’s broadband targets for 2020.

FTTH forecast Babaali #NextGen12 @FTTHCouncilEU. Europe will get there at 2020 UK will get there after 2022!
UK to not reach fibre to the home maturity (20% homes connected) until after 2022!! #NextGen12
#ftth "UK won’t reach fibre maturity until way past 2022" #nextgen12 #digitalbritain
Upload Speeds and Stability are key. Consumer demand is not an issue – but it takes a little time for consumers to learn how to exploit higher quality networks. It also takes time for operators to understand that it can be highly profitable.

There are continental case studies available on the FTT Council website. NextGen is assisting the Council in finding additional case studies from the UK.

Nadia Babaali charting Diffraction Analysis FTTH Service provider study @fiberguy #NextGen12 @FTTHCouncilEU
#nextgen12 If predictions by @ftthcouncileu come to pass then UK will miss Digital Agenda target of 100Mbps for 50% of homes by 2020

Local case studies

Fredi Nonyelu – MK Business Broadband Survey

Fred Nonyelu kicks off with a local broadband survey undertaken by the Biztech Forum

Objectives to understand the state of play in the Mk area and find recommendations for the city.

16% of businesses involved directly in ICT and the responses reflected a stronger response from this sector.

The results showed many areas are effectively rural with very low broadband speeds – but this was also apparent in the city centre.

32% rated reliability as poor. 86% had upload speeds of less than 2mbps.

Fredi Nonyelu presents results of a survey of business needs for high speed broadband #NextGen12 twitpic.com/9qx2vz twitpic.com/9qx2z4Brian_Condon
#nextgen12 Fredi Nonyelu: businesses surveyed in Milton Keynes want to pay less than £30 per month for broadband
Only 14% had upload speeds greater than 8mbps.

The slides are detailed and will be available on the NextGen site as soon as possible.

On affordability the willingness to pay seemed to be limited to less than £30 – regardless of performance.

Several examples from local enterprises were reviewed in detail.

In summary
BDUK has awarded only £140k -to Milton Keynes – but MK council has allocation £2.4M and this is expected to be match-funded by operators.

Competition is seen as key – and whilst they welcome the work with BY they see the need to have a local dimension and get away from a ‘1 size fits all’ approach.

Fredi then finished by reviewing the challenges and opportunities – and the need for the infrastructure to match the future vision for the city.

The Brooklands Development

Graeme Scott Technical Account Manager IFNL

A different approach to #ngn with INFL "treating it as a utility" #NextGen12 "get what you pay for" twitpic.com/9qx54uBrian_Condon
INFL is pre-providing each plot with a basic infrastructure that is open for use by any operator.

This means no street furniture – the entire infrastructure is underground.

#NextGen12 Graeme Scott claims that IFNL delivers fastest broadband in the UK – 200Mbps on Brooklands development in MK
"@brian_condon: A different approach to #ngn with INFL "treating it as a utility" #NextGen12 "get what you pay for". Excellent approach.
@GreySkyConsult @brian_condon "You get what you pay for" shouldn’t that be "pay for what you use" as in how utilities charge? #NextGen12
What households need – implies FTTC can’t cope – says Graeme Scott of IFNL #NextGen12 twitpic.com/9qx6ilBrian_Condon
Research shows more clearly that customers want fast upload and lower latency. They also want IPTV and the network is configured to deliver this (including Sky).

Telecoms is the same as any other utility.

TV requires 15Mbps per channel. Graeme highlights multiple concurrent applications.

Standard Service is 50Mbps down and 25Mbps upload speed. This is the fastest service in Milton Keynes.

This presentation highlights the value of a local operator – and further extensions from the scheme are being developed.

@Watchingtheflow IFNL offer choice of gas and electric suppliers on their other utility networks, aiming for the same with fibre #NextGen12danielheery

Milton Keynes Smart City

Prof Keith Straughan Interim Dean University College Milton Keynes

Smart Cities must be self aware and should be able to respond to external stimuli.

The evolution of city services – understanding the spiral of developments – requires a view of convergence of several human factors. Keith views that the technology focus of many models is mistaken – agriculture, education, water production – just three of the perspectives that are missing from government understanding.

Smart Cities demand increasing ‘knowledge sharing’. Keith cites Ofgem work on understand electricity demands.

Keith shows a new view of Smart Cities – but the hardest part is not technology but people factors – but it cannot move forward without an infrastructure that allows behaviours to change and evolve.

Time, Einstein and Everything Cool about NextGen Technology

Mark Kellett – CEO Magnet Networks
Trading and Gaming are drivers of #ngn says Mark Kellett of Magnet Networks. #NextGen12 http://twitpic.com/9qxdueBrian_Condon
For the last 2 years Magnet has been supplying services to new-build developments – not only in Ireland but in many parts of the UK – example Wembley and Greenwich.

Magnet provides an IPTV service and Sky services as well a open open access network.

They have developed special service for gamers – and much of the benefits are being felt in the Financial Services world of high-frequency trading.

Beware the JCB – Mark cites the customer who refused the offer of a back-up link – and lost 4 days work because of a digger!

Acceleration – more capacity is always taken up – so why do people still ask why they would need 100mbps? Once they have experienced it they will never let it go.

Latency is a vital quality issue for business users.

Aertv is live and social – 29% of viewers comment on social media – and 29% of TV viewers are viewing it in the bathroom!

You can find copies of the presentations on the NextGen Events website:
Mark Kellett – CEO Magnet Networksnextgenevents
NextGen Events :: Milton Keynes – 30 May :: PresentationsEvents Follow us on Twitter Follow us now " About us NG Events Ltd produces unique, high quality conferences, events and study tours incl…

The Onemedia Unconference

onemedia2

‘Creating a new blueprint for media businesses.’


The goal of the unconference was for the participants to set the agenda to find the cross industry business and collaboration opportunities that mattered to them, to increase their revenue and develop their business model.

Setting priorities
Setting priorities

Participants came from film, TV, games, mobile, web, software, interactive media, arts and design to see how they could collaborate and share. Each participant had the opportunity to suggest a session that they would like to run. Notes were taken and then collated together to create a book.
Over 30 sessions were created and run. Each session was written-up in the participants’ own words and is the start of a longer conversation. Sometimes after much debate, a session finished with more questions, sometimes a solution or further action planning was suggested.

Narrative and Storytelling

In an increasingly complex and media-saturated world, we need to help people connect with information/content in ways that are meaningful for them.

Not everything is a ‘story’ but we need to invest more time/effort in getting both content producers and consumers to develop their storytelling and narrative skills.

As an example, we could use story archetypes as a filter/ to explore/evaluate/distill the value of content and its connection with multiple audiences.

We need to go back to basics and think about how what we are doing could be changed/improved by re-visiting the fundamentals of narrative storytelling.

Here is one write-up of a session I was involved in.

Action plan: / Narrative and Storytelling Convener; Henry Playfoot, White Loop

Not everything is a story but do we need to invest more time/effort in getting people to develop their storytelling and narrative skills? If you started with the (say) twelve story archetypes use them as a filter/ explore/evaluate/distilling for discussing the efficacy/value of media content.

This could include collaborative experiments that marry ‘traditional’ storytellers with technologists or cutting edge digital service developers and projects that investigate the application of storytelling across all sectors.

Storytelling and Narrative

In an increasingly complex and media-saturated world, we need to help people connect with information/content in ways that are meaningful for them.

Not everything is a ‘story’ but we need to invest more time/effort in getting both content producers and consumers to develop their storytelling and narrative skills.

As an example, we could use story archetypes as a filter/ to explore/evaluate/distill the value of content and its connection with multiple audiences.

We need to go back to basics and think about how what we are doing could be changed/improved by re-visiting the fundamentals of narrative storytelling.

Related Issues:

Whilst we didn’t get very far in the discussion of this theme during the day it was noticeable that this session was so popular when people came to vote at the end of the day. Why was that? What is about ‘The Story’ that resonates and is so important to people?

What is the story now?

Stories still connect with people – it goes to the root of people’s emotions and there is a groundswell of interest in how storytelling/narrative can be used across every sphere – from politics/policy through to business and communities. Within this we should explore the impact and opportunities afforded by digital technology/platforms. With online gaming, for example, there is no longer one storyteller- there are multiple storytellers. Who is the protagonist/ who is the narrator and how do these shifts influence our experiences? There are strong arguments to suggest we need stories now more than ever. We need authorative voices that can help us navigate the often overwhelming amount of information that bombards us. In the emerging Web 3.0 world, we need authoritative and AUTHENTIC voices to help make sense of the world and the vast amount of noise/content. Business communities are beginning to talk about storytelling. We all know that great business leaders and educators are great storytellers. Their skills do not lie in spouting statistics or presenting data, rather than in distilling disparate threads into a coherent story.

Next Steps

In the creative industries – especially those under the One Media banner – we have unrivalled storytelling capacity. It is what we do, from conception of a game through to delivery of complex, cross-platform content and services.

Keeping an eye on some of the excellent work being undertaken in the UK eg Mike Wilson, University of Glamorgan, DEMOS the role of blogging/self narrating to support literacy (see recent report) and research in the US and Canada into the power of storytelling, NESTA should help ensure we formally embed storytelling skills into our offer.

This could include collaborative experiments that marry ‘traditional’ storytellers with technologists or cutting edge digital service developers and projects that investigate the application of storytelling across all sectors. We are convinced that we would get some real insights and that there would be hard economic benefits in terms of generating revenue for One Media businesses through providing expertise and creative consultancy. Additionally, we have identified that formalising and sharing these skills would support the integration of new people into our sector – especially powerful when thinking of equipping graduates/entry level staff with the requisite skills/attributes to succeed.

Co-Conspirators: Henry Playfoot, Brian Condon, Tim Furby, Paul Dorman, George Stamkoski